Happy Birthday, Grandfather

Happy Birthday to the man who taught me to read a newspaper, spell the 500 most commonly misspelled words, and who could beat me at a math problem every time, even though he’d give me a calculator while he did his math with his fingers in the air. Franklin Dolan March 15, 1912 – March 17, 1992...

Ancient Irish Research is Underway in the R-DF21 Haplogroup Project: L1403 Update

On August 31, 2011, I joined the R-DF21 and Subclades Project at Family Tree DNA with a kit I  manage that represents my maternal grandfather’s Y-DNA, or direct male line. My grandfather’s favorite day was St. Patrick’s Day, and also the day that he died, just two days after his 80th birthday. He would be happy to know that as we approach his 103rd birthday, his Dolan DNA signature is being pushed back in time by an amazing group of administrators, researchers, and project members. When I was a little girl, he told me that his father went from Ireland to England to marry his mother. I know that he would love this work and he would be delighted to know that he is a descendant of the Seven Septs of Laois. Last night, R-DF21 and Subclades Project Administrator David R. Moore sent out the following memorandum. I am honored that he has given me his blessing to share it with the wider genealogical community. I am so excited to be a part of this project, led by a remarkable group of pioneers.  The last 3 1/2 years as a DF21 project member have been an adventure and I’m looking forward to many more. My deepest gratitude goes to all who have contributed. I am anxiously awaiting the next update!   M E M O R A N D U M To:        R-DF21 Haplogroup Project;  Groups B1, B4, B5 et.al. From:   David R Moore, Project Administrator,   drenzomo@bellsouth.net Re:        Project update   March 2015 From time to time project members ask me about the current state of research on the Seven Septs...

NERGC Early Bird Deadline is February 28th!

The 13th New England Regional Genealogical Conference Navigating the Past: Sailing into the Future will be held in Providence, Rhode Island on 15-18 April 2015. The conference will include more than 90 lectures by speakers including Judy G. Russell, Lisa Louise Cooke, and Genealogy Roadshow host Joshua Taylor, as well as Ancestors Roadshow, Special Interest Groups, workshops, and a bonus track of presentations in the exhibit hall. For more information or to register visit...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Sunday

I had to make a choice to get this out now and messy or later and edited… I think most people want it NOW so please don’t mind the typos. These are basically raw notes with no proofreading. Dr. Michael Hammer presented Ancient and Modern DNA Update: How many ancestral populations for Europeans? Ancient DNA is the key to figuring out the historical processes that led up to the DNA of today. How do we know what the historical situation was that led us to the present? We can look at ancient DNA. Dr. Hammer shared a study that shows that genes in Europe may have come from a third source. There is a northeast Asian-related admixture in northern Europeans.­ A study by Rahavan et al. (2013) sequenced the genome of a 24,000 year old Siberian individual, which was genetically similar to Native Americans and West Eurasians, but not close to East Asians. About two or three weeks ago a paper came out in Nature by Lazaridis and about 100 other authors, including Dr. Hammer. This was the first study to fully sequence genomes of Neolithic and Mesolithic Europeans. There were nine ancient genomes that were fully sequenced. The samples came from Sweden about 8,000 years old, Loschbour about 8,000 years old, and Stuttgart, about 7,000 years ago. SNP data was analyzed with >2,300 worldwide samples. There was a discontinuity of Europeans and Near Easterners in the PCA clusters. The genomic data from the ancient samples was projected onto a modern map. They form three clusters, Western Hunter-Gatherer (WHG) meta-population based on the genome from Loschbour, Luxembourg, Early European...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy – ISOGG Meeting

Katherine Borges opened the day with the International Society of Genetic Genealogy meeting. Katherine shared about the founding of ISOGG and its mission. In 2002, the Y-Chromosome Consortium wanted to come up with a standardization for the Y tree. ISOGG later began maintaining a Y-Tree at the request of Dick Kenyon and Alice Fairhurst. Alice has done much of the work to maintain the list since inception. There are now more than 50 citations of the ISOGG tree in academic papers. Katherine mentioned the ISOGG wiki, which is contributed to by members. You can have a website for your DNA project within the wiki. Be sure to check out what others have done. Another popular page on the wiki is the DNA Comparison charts page. One of the newer things that moved on to the ISOGG site last year is Thomas Krahn’s chromosome browser. There is a private ISOGG – Admin Yahoo group for administrators only and posts within the list may not be posted outside of the list. There is also an ISOGG – DNA Newbie Yahoo Group that all people may join. There are currently 3,281 subscribers and it is a very busy list!  There is also an ISOGG Facebook Group. This is a closed group but it is not limited to ISOGG members. Anyone who is a real person and not a spammer can join. ISOGG has a presence at many conferences in London, California, Glasgow, and Dublin, where they assist with DNA testing and education. ISOGG also does advocacy. Katherine, along with others, have been working hard on behalf of consumers. Katherine then presented plaques...

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