Education Plan: Have you got one?

Most who know me know that I thrive on learning new things. I finished my MBA with a concentration in Project Management in 2006 and took a few years off before completing the Boston University Genealogical Certificate Program in December 2012 and ProGen Study Group in February 2013. During the ProGen 13 course, I was required to write an education plan. I haven’t been writing them formally since then, but I thought it might be fun to lay it out in writing for the year and perhaps others might benefit from learning about some educational opportunities in the genealogy field. Boston University Advanced Forensic Genealogy GEN222 – I have heard great things about this course from a few friends who have attended. The course description states, “This course not only presents the practical and theoretical aspects of conducting a commercial practice in forensic genealogy, it also offers instruction on creative elements essential to successful casework. By working through actual case studies, students will learn innovative ways to conduct the investigative process by locating sources of information, analyzing data, and reporting findings.” I have two prerequisite homework assignments to complete before the course in August and I plan to make the most of them! What could be better than a week in Boston? I really wanted to take the Family History Writing course being offered. Decisions, decisions! Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Advanced Genealogical Methods Track 9 – This course is a must do for all serious genealogists! The course description states, “The course will address advanced use of evidence from a variety of genealogical records and research in populations...

Family Tree DNA Announces Free Webinars

Family Tree DNA is now offering FREE live webinars.  Sign up for any or all that interest you.  Kudos to Elise Freidman for including information on X chromosome matching so quickly! There are also three pre-recorded webinars to watch at your convenience.  Don’t pass up these wonderful resources. January Schedule of Free Live Webinars Family Tree DNA Feature Launch: X Chromosome Matches in Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19Wohgg On January 2, 2014, Family Tree DNA launched an exciting update for Family Finder: X chromosome matches!  This webinar will provide a brief overview of the new tools on the Matches and Chromosome Browser pages for viewing and analyzing your X chromosome match information. myFTDNA: Managing Your Personal Account at Family Tree DNA Time: Thursday, January 9, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19WorUP Learn your way around your personal myFTDNA account at Family Tree DNA! We’ll cover basic account settings, where to locate your results when they come in, how to upload a GEDCOM (family tree), how to update your Most Distant Ancestor information and map coordinates for your ancestral location, how to join projects and account privacy. (Note: This webinar does not cover interpreting your results. We have other webinars dedicated to understanding your results!) Family Tree DNA Results Explained, Part 3: Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/196yt7L An information-packed webinar focusing on how to read and understand your Family Finder results. Learn about autosomal & X DNA inheritance, how Family Finder determines your relationship with your matches, how to use the Chromosome Browser, and much more!...

NERGC 2013 – Saturday

Another early morning.  This morning started with a ProGen breakfast at 7:00 A.M.  It was nice to get to visit with other ProGen members and also to spend some time with my mentor, Sandy Clunies.  Christine Cook from my group was also in attendance.  It was great for the three of us to have a chance to chat. The first session I attend this morning was Craig Scott’s “Getting Ink on Paper: Publishing Your Genealogical Material in the Digital Age.”  Of all the sessions I attended during this conference, this is by far the one that taught me the most new things that I did not know before.  If you are even slightly interested in publishing, this is a must-see lecture. Next, I went to get a seat for Elissa Scalise Powell’s “Eating an Elephant: Managing Large Projects.”  This talk discussed methods of completing large tasks such as publication, website building, certification, or society work.  Prioritization is key in large project management, as is delegation.  Tools such as Storyboard That, Mind View 5, and Scrivener can be very useful tools, as can an old-fashioned notebook with tabs. The NEAPG luncheon was quite enjoyable.  I sat at the Connecticut table, along with Barbara Mathews and Claire Ammon.  We had the opportunity to discuss some Connecticut resources.  Claire and I worked together to help one of our table visitors come up with a list of possible resources and repositories for New Haven ancestors. By the time the afternoon rolled around, I was VERY tired but I really wanted to attend “Researching a Community” by David Allen Lambert.  David shared the way that he built a website...

NERGC 2013 – Friday

Wow, today seemed to go on forever but I’ll try to give a quick recap before going to bed so that I can be back at the conference hotel in less than six hours.  Exhausting but totally worth it!  I’m not used to burning the candle on both ends like this but it’s not everyday that I get to see old friends and make new ones.  Please overlook typos tonight because proof-reading is simply not going to happen! This morning I was slated to volunteer at Registration starting at 7 A.M.  I was able to have a very nice conversation with Beth Mariotti, Director of Godfrey Memorial Library.  I am on the board of the Friends of Godfrey.  If you have not checked out Godfrey Memorial Library and the Godfrey Scholar website, you should!  Stephen Morse recently redesigned the site and it’s wonderful. Around 8 A.M. I received a message asking me to help with the mayor’s visit.  I was happy to be able to help by taking the photos during his visit.  I posted a few of those here earlier today. I finished taking photos just in time to get to Colleen Fitzpatrick’s talk, “The Secrets of Abraham Lincoln’s DNA.”  This talk was filled with many interesting facts.  Of course, I like anything that involves genetic genealogy so it certainly wasn’t a hard sell for me. After this talk, there was some unopposed exhibitor time.  GeneaBloggers took this opportunity to go to the designated area in the conference hall and have a meet and greet and get some blog posts published.  How fun to meet so many of our fellow...

NERGC 2013 – Thursday

This morning I arrived at 7:00 A.M. to volunteer at the Registration area and found out that I won a prize in the Volunteer Raffle!  I won a copy of Historical Timeline: The New England States, which was provided by Mass Researchers of Upton, MA.  Thank you for the wonderful prize.  I’m always happy to win something but this will be especially useful for me.  I love timelines! After helping out for a while, I was to meet a friend for breakfast.  She had to run off to get materials for a last minute presenter change, but the rest of us who had been planning to meet with her had breakfast together anyway.  It turns out that one of her friends grew up in Digby, Nova Scotia, a place that is on my “must visit” list.  My second lucky happening of the day! Opening session, “Millhand Migrations to 19th Century Lawrence and Lowell, Massachusetts,” was presented by my ProGen 13 mentor, Sandra McLean Clunies.  Sandy is an amazing speaker.  She is organized, pulled together, relaxed, natural, and FUNNY!  I just love her.  I was so happy to be able to help her as much as I could with getting her things put together after the presentation.  The talk gave some background on the role of mills in the Industrial Revolution and then provided case studies of three individuals.  What amazing, and sometimes tragic, stories came out of the mill towns.  We learned of the Pemberton Mill collapse, which was one of the worst industrial accidents in American history.  The five-story building had been filled with heavy equipment, which caused the collapse.  Many were...

NERGC 2013 New England Regional Genealogical Conference – Tech Day

NERGC 2013 kicked off today at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center in Manchester, New Hampshire.  If my count at lunch was correct, about 150 people turned out for this new offering at NERGC.  It seems that it was a success! First to talk today was Stephen P. Morse, best known for his invention of the 8086 processor. Morse gave a talk called “Deep Linking and Deeper Linking: How to get the most out of existing Search Applications.”  The purpose of this talk, according to the handout, was “to expose you to the techniques that were used on the One-Step website and give you a better appreciation for what there is and how to use it.”  Morse talked about URL editing, using search forms, man in the middle, and complete takeover.  He shared how to block deep linking and defeating the deep-linking block.  Notes that contain the information from this presentation can be found online at www.stevemorse.org under publications. The next speaker was Laura Prescott, who presented “Publish Your Genealogy Online.”  As always, Prescott was an informative and engaging speaker.  She reviewed available genealogy software and gave an introduction to options for building a genealogy website.  Genealogy software can be used to make webpages to be uploaded to the internet.  Alternately, the webpages can be made online.  Ancestry.com offers a solution to put your information online to share if you choose.  TNG, The Next Generation of Genealogy sitebuilding builds pages for online sharing by using GEDCOMs that can be created using any genealogy software.  Some items to consider when building a website include cost, domain name, publishing options, layout, sharing and control options, and alternatives to viewing online....

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