Ancient Irish Research is Underway in the R-DF21 Haplogroup Project: L1403 Update

On August 31, 2011, I joined the R-DF21 and Subclades Project at Family Tree DNA with a kit I  manage that represents my maternal grandfather’s Y-DNA, or direct male line. My grandfather’s favorite day was St. Patrick’s Day, and also the day that he died, just two days after his 80th birthday. He would be happy to know that as we approach his 103rd birthday, his Dolan DNA signature is being pushed back in time by an amazing group of administrators, researchers, and project members. When I was a little girl, he told me that his father went from Ireland to England to marry his mother. I know that he would love this work and he would be delighted to know that he is a descendant of the Seven Septs of Laois. Last night, R-DF21 and Subclades Project Administrator David R. Moore sent out the following memorandum. I am honored that he has given me his blessing to share it with the wider genealogical community. I am so excited to be a part of this project, led by a remarkable group of pioneers.  The last 3 1/2 years as a DF21 project member have been an adventure and I’m looking forward to many more. My deepest gratitude goes to all who have contributed. I am anxiously awaiting the next update!   M E M O R A N D U M To:        R-DF21 Haplogroup Project;  Groups B1, B4, B5 et.al. From:   David R Moore, Project Administrator,   drenzomo@bellsouth.net Re:        Project update   March 2015 From time to time project members ask me about the current state of research on the Seven Septs...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Sunday

I had to make a choice to get this out now and messy or later and edited… I think most people want it NOW so please don’t mind the typos. These are basically raw notes with no proofreading. Dr. Michael Hammer presented Ancient and Modern DNA Update: How many ancestral populations for Europeans? Ancient DNA is the key to figuring out the historical processes that led up to the DNA of today. How do we know what the historical situation was that led us to the present? We can look at ancient DNA. Dr. Hammer shared a study that shows that genes in Europe may have come from a third source. There is a northeast Asian-related admixture in northern Europeans.­ A study by Rahavan et al. (2013) sequenced the genome of a 24,000 year old Siberian individual, which was genetically similar to Native Americans and West Eurasians, but not close to East Asians. About two or three weeks ago a paper came out in Nature by Lazaridis and about 100 other authors, including Dr. Hammer. This was the first study to fully sequence genomes of Neolithic and Mesolithic Europeans. There were nine ancient genomes that were fully sequenced. The samples came from Sweden about 8,000 years old, Loschbour about 8,000 years old, and Stuttgart, about 7,000 years ago. SNP data was analyzed with >2,300 worldwide samples. There was a discontinuity of Europeans and Near Easterners in the PCA clusters. The genomic data from the ancient samples was projected onto a modern map. They form three clusters, Western Hunter-Gatherer (WHG) meta-population based on the genome from Loschbour, Luxembourg, Early European...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy

  Family Tree DNA kicked off its Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy at the Hyatt North Houston in Houston, Texas.  Max Blankenfeld welcomed the crowd of more than 180 group administrators and acknowledged those who had been to all ten conferences as well as those who have been group administrators for more than ten years. Max encouraged constructive feedback of Family Tree DNA in order to be sure the company moves in a way that works for the administrators and customers. Bennett Greenspan gave an overview of the speakers for the weekend. The first speaker of the morning, Dr. Blaine Bettinger, is an intellectual property attorney who writes The Genetic Genealogist blog. Blaine pointed out that there are no “Ethics Police” and you will not go to ethics jail, although there may be consequences. He reminded us that we need to be proactive instead of reactive in order to increase positive feedback and reduce the negatives. The way to do this is through education. Be sure to remind individuals to read Terms of Use but you do need to explain further and not rely on this, as most people do not read terms of use. Be sure to provide information to project members about what information will be made publicly available. Surprises occur and people should be aware of this before testing. Blaine warned to be aware of genetic exceptionalism. DNA reveals family secrets every day. Never promise anonymity, as DNA is identifiable by nature. It is important that we never promise the absence of medical information, as we don’t know what we don’t know. Blaine reviewed GINA and...

Education Plan: Have you got one?

Most who know me know that I thrive on learning new things. I finished my MBA with a concentration in Project Management in 2006 and took a few years off before completing the Boston University Genealogical Certificate Program in December 2012 and ProGen Study Group in February 2013. During the ProGen 13 course, I was required to write an education plan. I haven’t been writing them formally since then, but I thought it might be fun to lay it out in writing for the year and perhaps others might benefit from learning about some educational opportunities in the genealogy field. Boston University Advanced Forensic Genealogy GEN222 – I have heard great things about this course from a few friends who have attended. The course description states, “This course not only presents the practical and theoretical aspects of conducting a commercial practice in forensic genealogy, it also offers instruction on creative elements essential to successful casework. By working through actual case studies, students will learn innovative ways to conduct the investigative process by locating sources of information, analyzing data, and reporting findings.” I have two prerequisite homework assignments to complete before the course in August and I plan to make the most of them! What could be better than a week in Boston? I really wanted to take the Family History Writing course being offered. Decisions, decisions! Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Advanced Genealogical Methods Track 9 – This course is a must do for all serious genealogists! The course description states, “The course will address advanced use of evidence from a variety of genealogical records and research in populations...

Family Tree DNA Updates and New Features – June 2014

The Engineering team at Family Tree DNA has been busy preparing some new settings and features for us. Over the past week or two, there had been some question among admins about pricing on the Y-DNA25 test. It has been adjusted to put it inline with other tests. A SNP search feature has been added on the Haplotree page. Also, there are new myOrigins cluster names. Many will be happy to hear that Deep Clade Extended SNP results have been restored. Here are today’s release notes: 1. Added a privacy setting that will allow a user to opt out of Big Y matching. By default, matching is enabled. If someone opts out of matching they will not be able to see Big Y matches and other users will not see them. The opt in/out setting is located in the myFTDNA Account Settings page, under the “Match and E-mail settings” tab. Here is the setting: ​2. Updated the retail price for Y-DNA25 from $229 to $109. This will put it in line with our other Y-DNA product prices. Upgrade prices were also edited accordingly. 3. Created a SNP search feature on the Haplotree page to aid users in locating a SNP of interest. It is located at the top right side of the Haplotree page. The page will scroll down to the SNP being searched for and highlighted it with a yellow bar. Even SNPs buried in the “More…” pop up will be searched! Here is a pic of the search bar: and here is what a successful search looks like: 4. We restored Deep Clade Extended SNP results. These...

Family Tree DNA Announces Free Webinars

Family Tree DNA is now offering FREE live webinars.  Sign up for any or all that interest you.  Kudos to Elise Freidman for including information on X chromosome matching so quickly! There are also three pre-recorded webinars to watch at your convenience.  Don’t pass up these wonderful resources. January Schedule of Free Live Webinars Family Tree DNA Feature Launch: X Chromosome Matches in Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19Wohgg On January 2, 2014, Family Tree DNA launched an exciting update for Family Finder: X chromosome matches!  This webinar will provide a brief overview of the new tools on the Matches and Chromosome Browser pages for viewing and analyzing your X chromosome match information. myFTDNA: Managing Your Personal Account at Family Tree DNA Time: Thursday, January 9, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19WorUP Learn your way around your personal myFTDNA account at Family Tree DNA! We’ll cover basic account settings, where to locate your results when they come in, how to upload a GEDCOM (family tree), how to update your Most Distant Ancestor information and map coordinates for your ancestral location, how to join projects and account privacy. (Note: This webinar does not cover interpreting your results. We have other webinars dedicated to understanding your results!) Family Tree DNA Results Explained, Part 3: Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/196yt7L An information-packed webinar focusing on how to read and understand your Family Finder results. Learn about autosomal & X DNA inheritance, how Family Finder determines your relationship with your matches, how to use the Chromosome Browser, and much more!...

© 2009-2015 Jennifer Zinck All Rights Reserved