Education Plan: Have you got one?

Most who know me know that I thrive on learning new things. I finished my MBA with a concentration in Project Management in 2006 and took a few years off before completing the Boston University Genealogical Certificate Program in December 2012 and ProGen Study Group in February 2013. During the ProGen 13 course, I was required to write an education plan. I haven’t been writing them formally since then, but I thought it might be fun to lay it out in writing for the year and perhaps others might benefit from learning about some educational opportunities in the genealogy field. Boston University Advanced Forensic Genealogy GEN222 – I have heard great things about this course from a few friends who have attended. The course description states, “This course not only presents the practical and theoretical aspects of conducting a commercial practice in forensic genealogy, it also offers instruction on creative elements essential to successful casework. By working through actual case studies, students will learn innovative ways to conduct the investigative process by locating sources of information, analyzing data, and reporting findings.” I have two prerequisite homework assignments to complete before the course in August and I plan to make the most of them! What could be better than a week in Boston? I really wanted to take the Family History Writing course being offered. Decisions, decisions! Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Advanced Genealogical Methods Track 9 – This course is a must do for all serious genealogists! The course description states, “The course will address advanced use of evidence from a variety of genealogical records and research in populations...

Evidence Management

One of the hot topics in GeneaBlogging land this week is fact versus conclusion based data entry.  The gist of the discussion is whether to use software to enter conclusions only.  Over the years, I have found it to be quite a challenge to keep track of sources and such.  For me, there is no doubt that my work improved drastically when I learned to do document-based data entry, or evidence-based, as it is being referred to. I use a couple of different software programs for a couple of different purposes.  Not all of my work is academic or research reports.  I am also very interested in DNA, which requires a different sort of tree.  When working with autosomal DNA, those non-documented trees that stretch far into Fantasyland can actually be helpful.  I primarily use Family Tree Maker 2012 for this.  One of the reasons to utilize autosomal DNA testing is to find unknown connections, so it makes sense for both parties to look to otherwise thinly-documented lines and supplement with DNA.  This can be especially useful when there is a group of people who match in the same area of the same chromosome, yet have an unknown connection.  It is oftentimes easier to pick out a match when working with trees for a small group rather than just two individuals.  I digress, I am not here to talk about DNA today. Coincidentally, I was just discussing the use of document-based entries with the ladies at my local Family History Center yesterday.  I explained to them that I use Roots Magic 5 as my “document-based” software.  When I use that software, I set up the source first, memorize it, and...

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