Evidence Management

One of the hot topics in GeneaBlogging land this week is fact versus conclusion based data entry.  The gist of the discussion is whether to use software to enter conclusions only.  Over the years, I have found it to be quite a challenge to keep track of sources and such.  For me, there is no doubt that my work improved drastically when I learned to do document-based data entry, or evidence-based, as it is being referred to. I use a couple of different software programs for a couple of different purposes.  Not all of my work is academic or research reports.  I am also very interested in DNA, which requires a different sort of tree.  When working with autosomal DNA, those non-documented trees that stretch far into Fantasyland can actually be helpful.  I primarily use Family Tree Maker 2012 for this.  One of the reasons to utilize autosomal DNA testing is to find unknown connections, so it makes sense for both parties to look to otherwise thinly-documented lines and supplement with DNA.  This can be especially useful when there is a group of people who match in the same area of the same chromosome, yet have an unknown connection.  It is oftentimes easier to pick out a match when working with trees for a small group rather than just two individuals.  I digress, I am not here to talk about DNA today. Coincidentally, I was just discussing the use of document-based entries with the ladies at my local Family History Center yesterday.  I explained to them that I use Roots Magic 5 as my “document-based” software.  When I use that software, I set up the source first, memorize it, and...

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