Historic Map Works

Historic Map Works is a database containing more than 1.5 million full color digital maps, with thousands more being added monthly.  For members of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, access to this database is now included.   Members can access Historic Map Works by going to the NEHGS American Ancestors website.  On the “Search” tab, click on “External Databases” and then scroll down to find Historic Map Works. The location of the building now known as the Henry Whitfield Museum, said to be the oldest stone house in the United States, can be seen on this 1868 map of Guilford, Connecticut.[i]   At the time of the survey, it was the property of Mrs. H.W. Chittenden. Mary, wife of Henry Ward Chittenden, had inherited this property from her mother, Mrs. Sarah (Brown) Grifling, said to be one of the wealthiest women in Connecticut at the time.[ii]   Sources: i W. Beers, surveyor, Atlas of New Haven County Connecticut: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F.W. Beers assisted by A.B. Prindle and others (New York: F.W. Beers, A.D. Ellis, and G.G. Soule, 1868),Guilford; digital image, Historic Map Works, LLC, Historic Map Works Distributed by ProQuest (http://www.proquest.historicmapworks.com :accessed 05 Mar 2012).  ii William Given Andrews, The Henry Whitfield House, 2nd ed. (Guilford, Connecticut: Shoreline Times, 1909),8; digital image, Internet Archive, Open Library (http://openlibrary.org/ : accessed 05 Mar...

A Day at the National Archives in Waltham

For some, a visit to the National Archives is routine but for those of us who don’t live nearby, it is a special treat.  Yesterday I had the opportunity to visit NARA in Waltham, Massachusetts, attend a 1940 Census Workshop sponsored by the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists, see some old friends, and make some new ones.  All in all, a great day in genealogy land! When I walked in, the guard said, “It’s 8:01!  I wondered who was coming in the parking lot at this hour.  You don’t mess around.”  No, Sir, I don’t.  By 8:10 I had my coat put away, my belongings in a locker, and was learning the ropes.  The staff is extremely nice and, since I came prepared with a list, I was able to do my lookups pretty quickly. Once I had my list, one of the staff assisted me to complete an application for researcher identification and showed me how to complete the Reference Service Slip.  Since it was a busy day, they asked if it would be ok if they gave me copies at no charge.  That was certainly fine with me, although I can see that it’s going to be a little trickier for me to come up with proper source citations this way. By the time I finished my lookups, people from MSOG started coming in.  Pat Stano-Carpenter, President of Massachusetts Society of Genealogists, gave me her I <3 Indexing pin.  Thank you, Pat!  I love goodies!  It was great to see everyone. Jean Nudd, NARA Archivist, gave a presentation about the 1940 census.  I can’t wait to dig in and read the...

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