What's News?

Happy Birthday, Grandfather

Happy Birthday to the man who taught me to read a newspaper, spell the 500 most commonly misspelled words, and who could beat me at a math problem every time, even though he’d give me a calculator while he did his math with his fingers in the air. Franklin Dolan March 15, 1912 – March 17, 1992...

Ancient Irish Research is Underway in the R-DF21 Haplogroup Project: L1403 Update

On August 31, 2011, I joined the R-DF21 and Subclades Project at Family Tree DNA with a kit I  manage that represents my maternal grandfather’s Y-DNA, or direct male line. My grandfather’s favorite day was St. Patrick’s Day, and also the day that he died, just two days after his 80th birthday. He would be happy to know that as we approach his 103rd birthday, his Dolan DNA signature is being pushed back in time by an amazing group of administrators, researchers, and project members. When I was a little girl, he told me that his father went from Ireland to England to marry his mother. I know that he would love this work and he would be delighted to know that he is a descendant of the Seven Septs of Laois. Last night, R-DF21 and Subclades Project Administrator David R. Moore sent out the following memorandum. I am honored that he has given me his blessing to share it with the wider genealogical community. I am so excited to be a part of this project, led by a remarkable group of pioneers.  The last 3 1/2 years as a DF21 project member have been an adventure and I’m looking forward to many more. My deepest gratitude goes to all who have contributed. I am anxiously awaiting the next update!   M E M O R A N D U M To:        R-DF21 Haplogroup Project;  Groups B1, B4, B5 et.al. From:   David R Moore, Project Administrator,   drenzomo@bellsouth.net Re:        Project update   March 2015 From time to time project members ask me about the current state of research on the Seven Septs...

NERGC Early Bird Deadline is February 28th!

The 13th New England Regional Genealogical Conference Navigating the Past: Sailing into the Future will be held in Providence, Rhode Island on 15-18 April 2015. The conference will include more than 90 lectures by speakers including Judy G. Russell, Lisa Louise Cooke, and Genealogy Roadshow host Joshua Taylor, as well as Ancestors Roadshow, Special Interest Groups, workshops, and a bonus track of presentations in the exhibit hall. For more information or to register visit...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Sunday

I had to make a choice to get this out now and messy or later and edited… I think most people want it NOW so please don’t mind the typos. These are basically raw notes with no proofreading. Dr. Michael Hammer presented Ancient and Modern DNA Update: How many ancestral populations for Europeans? Ancient DNA is the key to figuring out the historical processes that led up to the DNA of today. How do we know what the historical situation was that led us to the present? We can look at ancient DNA. Dr. Hammer shared a study that shows that genes in Europe may have come from a third source. There is a northeast Asian-related admixture in northern Europeans.­ A study by Rahavan et al. (2013) sequenced the genome of a 24,000 year old Siberian individual, which was genetically similar to Native Americans and West Eurasians, but not close to East Asians. About two or three weeks ago a paper came out in Nature by Lazaridis and about 100 other authors, including Dr. Hammer. This was the first study to fully sequence genomes of Neolithic and Mesolithic Europeans. There were nine ancient genomes that were fully sequenced. The samples came from Sweden about 8,000 years old, Loschbour about 8,000 years old, and Stuttgart, about 7,000 years ago. SNP data was analyzed with >2,300 worldwide samples. There was a discontinuity of Europeans and Near Easterners in the PCA clusters. The genomic data from the ancient samples was projected onto a modern map. They form three clusters, Western Hunter-Gatherer (WHG) meta-population based on the genome from Loschbour, Luxembourg, Early European...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy – ISOGG Meeting

Katherine Borges opened the day with the International Society of Genetic Genealogy meeting. Katherine shared about the founding of ISOGG and its mission. In 2002, the Y-Chromosome Consortium wanted to come up with a standardization for the Y tree. ISOGG later began maintaining a Y-Tree at the request of Dick Kenyon and Alice Fairhurst. Alice has done much of the work to maintain the list since inception. There are now more than 50 citations of the ISOGG tree in academic papers. Katherine mentioned the ISOGG wiki, which is contributed to by members. You can have a website for your DNA project within the wiki. Be sure to check out what others have done. Another popular page on the wiki is the DNA Comparison charts page. One of the newer things that moved on to the ISOGG site last year is Thomas Krahn’s chromosome browser. There is a private ISOGG – Admin Yahoo group for administrators only and posts within the list may not be posted outside of the list. There is also an ISOGG – DNA Newbie Yahoo Group that all people may join. There are currently 3,281 subscribers and it is a very busy list!  There is also an ISOGG Facebook Group. This is a closed group but it is not limited to ISOGG members. Anyone who is a real person and not a spammer can join. ISOGG has a presence at many conferences in London, California, Glasgow, and Dublin, where they assist with DNA testing and education. ISOGG also does advocacy. Katherine, along with others, have been working hard on behalf of consumers. Katherine then presented plaques...

Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy

  Family Tree DNA kicked off its Decennial Conference on Genetic Genealogy at the Hyatt North Houston in Houston, Texas.  Max Blankenfeld welcomed the crowd of more than 180 group administrators and acknowledged those who had been to all ten conferences as well as those who have been group administrators for more than ten years. Max encouraged constructive feedback of Family Tree DNA in order to be sure the company moves in a way that works for the administrators and customers. Bennett Greenspan gave an overview of the speakers for the weekend. The first speaker of the morning, Dr. Blaine Bettinger, is an intellectual property attorney who writes The Genetic Genealogist blog. Blaine pointed out that there are no “Ethics Police” and you will not go to ethics jail, although there may be consequences. He reminded us that we need to be proactive instead of reactive in order to increase positive feedback and reduce the negatives. The way to do this is through education. Be sure to remind individuals to read Terms of Use but you do need to explain further and not rely on this, as most people do not read terms of use. Be sure to provide information to project members about what information will be made publicly available. Surprises occur and people should be aware of this before testing. Blaine warned to be aware of genetic exceptionalism. DNA reveals family secrets every day. Never promise anonymity, as DNA is identifiable by nature. It is important that we never promise the absence of medical information, as we don’t know what we don’t know. Blaine reviewed GINA and...

Education Plan: Have you got one?

Most who know me know that I thrive on learning new things. I finished my MBA with a concentration in Project Management in 2006 and took a few years off before completing the Boston University Genealogical Certificate Program in December 2012 and ProGen Study Group in February 2013. During the ProGen 13 course, I was required to write an education plan. I haven’t been writing them formally since then, but I thought it might be fun to lay it out in writing for the year and perhaps others might benefit from learning about some educational opportunities in the genealogy field. Boston University Advanced Forensic Genealogy GEN222 – I have heard great things about this course from a few friends who have attended. The course description states, “This course not only presents the practical and theoretical aspects of conducting a commercial practice in forensic genealogy, it also offers instruction on creative elements essential to successful casework. By working through actual case studies, students will learn innovative ways to conduct the investigative process by locating sources of information, analyzing data, and reporting findings.” I have two prerequisite homework assignments to complete before the course in August and I plan to make the most of them! What could be better than a week in Boston? I really wanted to take the Family History Writing course being offered. Decisions, decisions! Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Advanced Genealogical Methods Track 9 – This course is a must do for all serious genealogists! The course description states, “The course will address advanced use of evidence from a variety of genealogical records and research in populations...

Family Tree DNA Updates and New Features – June 2014

The Engineering team at Family Tree DNA has been busy preparing some new settings and features for us. Over the past week or two, there had been some question among admins about pricing on the Y-DNA25 test. It has been adjusted to put it inline with other tests. A SNP search feature has been added on the Haplotree page. Also, there are new myOrigins cluster names. Many will be happy to hear that Deep Clade Extended SNP results have been restored. Here are today’s release notes: 1. Added a privacy setting that will allow a user to opt out of Big Y matching. By default, matching is enabled. If someone opts out of matching they will not be able to see Big Y matches and other users will not see them. The opt in/out setting is located in the myFTDNA Account Settings page, under the “Match and E-mail settings” tab. Here is the setting: ​2. Updated the retail price for Y-DNA25 from $229 to $109. This will put it in line with our other Y-DNA product prices. Upgrade prices were also edited accordingly. 3. Created a SNP search feature on the Haplotree page to aid users in locating a SNP of interest. It is located at the top right side of the Haplotree page. The page will scroll down to the SNP being searched for and highlighted it with a yellow bar. Even SNPs buried in the “More…” pop up will be searched! Here is a pic of the search bar: and here is what a successful search looks like: 4. We restored Deep Clade Extended SNP results. These...

Family Tree DNA Announces Free Webinars

Family Tree DNA is now offering FREE live webinars.  Sign up for any or all that interest you.  Kudos to Elise Freidman for including information on X chromosome matching so quickly! There are also three pre-recorded webinars to watch at your convenience.  Don’t pass up these wonderful resources. January Schedule of Free Live Webinars Family Tree DNA Feature Launch: X Chromosome Matches in Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19Wohgg On January 2, 2014, Family Tree DNA launched an exciting update for Family Finder: X chromosome matches!  This webinar will provide a brief overview of the new tools on the Matches and Chromosome Browser pages for viewing and analyzing your X chromosome match information. myFTDNA: Managing Your Personal Account at Family Tree DNA Time: Thursday, January 9, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/19WorUP Learn your way around your personal myFTDNA account at Family Tree DNA! We’ll cover basic account settings, where to locate your results when they come in, how to upload a GEDCOM (family tree), how to update your Most Distant Ancestor information and map coordinates for your ancestral location, how to join projects and account privacy. (Note: This webinar does not cover interpreting your results. We have other webinars dedicated to understanding your results!) Family Tree DNA Results Explained, Part 3: Family Finder Time: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 @ 12pm Central (6pm GMT) Registration: http://bit.ly/196yt7L An information-packed webinar focusing on how to read and understand your Family Finder results. Learn about autosomal & X DNA inheritance, how Family Finder determines your relationship with your matches, how to use the Chromosome Browser, and much more!...

9th Annual International Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Day 2

*Note: It’s very late but I had a flight tonight and I wanted to get the information out.  With little sleep, I am sure there are countless errors.  I’ll fix it up tomorrow.  I figured everyone would rather have the information quickly rather than perfectly! The first thing on the agenda for the morning was the International Society of Genetic Genealogy 2013 Meeting.  ISOGG was born at the 2004 FTDNA conference.  Katherine Borges spoke about the development and launch of ISOGG in 2004 and 2005 and the fact that it is free.  It is a self-supporting and volunteer organization.  There is always a need for help.  If you have a niche where you can help, that would be great. The ISOGG Y-Browse is now up. One ISOGG wiki page that is getting a lot of hits is the new page for Free DNA Tests.  Many administrators sponsor tests and some projects raise money to sponsor tests. The Journal of Genetic of Genetic Genealogy was founded the same year as ISOGG at the FTDNA conference.  Katherine said that she has been lobbied to take JOGG under ISOGG’s umbrella but she has resisted because it wasn’t broken.  At this point JOGG is not working well but we are not at that point yet.  Katherine is determined not to let it die.  The current editor of JOGG is Dr. Turi King of the University of Leicester who worked on the King Richard III project.  Turi has been very busy with this and now there is a rumor that Dr. King will have to work on the King Arthur project. Katherine reminded us to be...

9th Annual International Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Day 1

Max Blankfeld opened the conference with a welcome.  Max talked about competition making for healthy growth.  This has been the best year ever and there are great things in the pipeline. In June of this year, what started as an acquisition became something that could be a guarantee of continuity for Family Tree DNA.  Three new people have been added to staff.  Nir Leibovich is the Chief Business Officer, David Mittelman is the Chief Scientific Officer, and Jason Wang is the Chief Technology Officer leading the Engineering Department. Max got a little bit emotional as he talked about people who have been great supporters of Family Tree DNA who are no longer with us.  He stressed that he really appreciates what they brought to the company and most importantly, their friendship.  He also sent best wishes to Bill Hurst for a speedy recovery. Bennett stepped up to join Max to talk about group administrators who have been with them for 10 years or more.  Each of these group administrators will receive a plaque to honor their years of commitment. Bennett talked a bit about the lab tours.  Approximately 60 people in total have or will attend lab tours during this conference period.  Bennett shared the news about the CAP certification.  This allows the company to justify the acquisition of some expensive instruments that will be beneficial to the genealogical community. The first speaker of the day was Amy McGuire, PhD, JD, of the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine, presenting Am I My Brother’s Keeper?  DNA Identifiability and Obligations to Biological Relatives in Genetic Genealogy. ...

Get your DNA test here! A tour of the Family Tree DNA Lab

It’s that time of year again!  Genetic Genealogy enthusiasts have gathered at the Sheraton North Houston for the 9th Annual International Conference on Genetic Genealogy.  This year lab tours were offered on Friday as well as Monday, which is great for those who plan to fly out on Sunday.  Bennett Greenspan, President of Family Tree DNA, welcomed our group to the lab. The lab at Family Tree DNA is a fully functional five or six day a week lab.  Our first stop was the Pre-PCR area where DNA has not been amplified.  Once DNA is amplified, it never returns to this area.  Our group put on lab coats and anyone with open-toed shoes put on booties. Bennett explained that all of the tubes have a red cap instead of the old tethered cap style.  The machine shown below automatically fills each tube with the buffer that allows the sample to sit for long periods.  The buffer arrests any potential for bacterial growth while the DNA is in the tube.  About 400 per hour can be produced by this machine. The next robot extracts approximately 600 samples per day during one normal shift.  Around Christmas time the process is doubled in order to extract 1,200 samples per day. The liquid handling robot takes DNA, puts it into a daughter plate, and puts a primer mix and a master mix in the well.  Master mix is a neutral solution and the primer mix might be for any of the Y-DNA SNPs that have to be used for a confirmation purpose. DNA samples that arrived yesterday or the day before that have not...

Not zombies, ghosts, or evil Halloween spirits

What caused the deaths of my ancestors?  Certainly not werewolves or vampires or zombies. Judy Russell spread the word that Nathan W. Murphy of  Family Search is to blame for this cadaverous compendium.  Not to be a spoil sport, I’ll play along. Let’s just say it’s a good thing I’ve decided not to be a smoker.  Breathing is always a good thing unless, of course, you are a zombie. I had one great grandfather whose official cause of death was partial cremation.  He died when his truck went down an embankment and caught on fire with him trapped underneath.  Not anything like the Halloween shows on television, but I’m sure it had to be living hell to burn to death, especially if he was still...

Autosomal DNA Tests for Parents?

I have already taken an autosomal DNA test.  Should I test my parent(s)? The answer is YES!  Absolutely! Because of the random way in which autosomal DNA is inherited, each child only receives a portion of each parent’s DNA.  The child is made up of 50% from the mother and 50% from the father but if no parents are tested, matches for that other 50% of each parents’ DNA will not be represented.  That is why it is so important to test parents first, especially if funds are limited and age or health could be a factor. At Family Tree DNA, my mother has 290 Family Finder matches in the database as of today.  Applying the “in common with” filter and selecting my name, there are only 116 matches.  Of my mother’s 290 matches, my results only reflect 116 of them.  This means that 174 maternal matches would have never been discovered without testing my mother.  Applying the “in common with” between my mother and sister only yields 108 matches, which means my sister would have lost even more genetic data than I would have if my mother and I had not tested.  Keep in mind, those “in common with” match lists that my sister and I have are not identical.  We have each inherited different bits of autosomal DNA and will, therefore, have some matches in common and some different. The reason that I tested my sister is because my father is deceased.  If I had a complete set of parental autosomal DNA, I might do my own autosomal DNA test for entertainment, but there would not be a significant...

The Results are In: My Mother’s Cousin’s DNA

Most of my maternal heritage is English and Irish.  My mother has many Family Tree DNA Family Finder matches for her autosomal DNA but I cannot tell whether they came from her mother’s side or her father’s side.  In order to try to sort this out, I need to test as many known cousins as possible. My mother has a first cousin who is the child of her father’s sister.  By testing K, as I will refer to her, I can find matches in common, which is often referred to as triangulation.  The only known common ancestors between my mother and her cousin K are James and Helen, their common grandparents.  Therefore, any segments that match between them should be inherited from James and Helen, their common ancestors. Family Tree DNA offers a tool called a chromosome browser, which can be used to examine common segments of autosomal DNA.  The chart above depicts the 22 autosomes of K.  The areas that are highlighted in orange are areas that my mom and K share identically in common.  The areas in blue are the areas that my mother’s brother shares identically in common with K.  As you can see, some of the shared areas are the same and some are different.  This is because of the random way in which autosomal DNA is inherited.  My mom and uncle both received a random shuffle of autosomal DNA from each of their parents. Any place where my mom or my uncle matches with K can be attributed to James and Helen.  If I had only tested my mom or only tested my uncle, I would have...

NERGC 2013 – Saturday

Another early morning.  This morning started with a ProGen breakfast at 7:00 A.M.  It was nice to get to visit with other ProGen members and also to spend some time with my mentor, Sandy Clunies.  Christine Cook from my group was also in attendance.  It was great for the three of us to have a chance to chat. The first session I attend this morning was Craig Scott’s “Getting Ink on Paper: Publishing Your Genealogical Material in the Digital Age.”  Of all the sessions I attended during this conference, this is by far the one that taught me the most new things that I did not know before.  If you are even slightly interested in publishing, this is a must-see lecture. Next, I went to get a seat for Elissa Scalise Powell’s “Eating an Elephant: Managing Large Projects.”  This talk discussed methods of completing large tasks such as publication, website building, certification, or society work.  Prioritization is key in large project management, as is delegation.  Tools such as Storyboard That, Mind View 5, and Scrivener can be very useful tools, as can an old-fashioned notebook with tabs. The NEAPG luncheon was quite enjoyable.  I sat at the Connecticut table, along with Barbara Mathews and Claire Ammon.  We had the opportunity to discuss some Connecticut resources.  Claire and I worked together to help one of our table visitors come up with a list of possible resources and repositories for New Haven ancestors. By the time the afternoon rolled around, I was VERY tired but I really wanted to attend “Researching a Community” by David Allen Lambert.  David shared the way that he built a website...

NERGC 2013 – Friday

Wow, today seemed to go on forever but I’ll try to give a quick recap before going to bed so that I can be back at the conference hotel in less than six hours.  Exhausting but totally worth it!  I’m not used to burning the candle on both ends like this but it’s not everyday that I get to see old friends and make new ones.  Please overlook typos tonight because proof-reading is simply not going to happen! This morning I was slated to volunteer at Registration starting at 7 A.M.  I was able to have a very nice conversation with Beth Mariotti, Director of Godfrey Memorial Library.  I am on the board of the Friends of Godfrey.  If you have not checked out Godfrey Memorial Library and the Godfrey Scholar website, you should!  Stephen Morse recently redesigned the site and it’s wonderful. Around 8 A.M. I received a message asking me to help with the mayor’s visit.  I was happy to be able to help by taking the photos during his visit.  I posted a few of those here earlier today. I finished taking photos just in time to get to Colleen Fitzpatrick’s talk, “The Secrets of Abraham Lincoln’s DNA.”  This talk was filled with many interesting facts.  Of course, I like anything that involves genetic genealogy so it certainly wasn’t a hard sell for me. After this talk, there was some unopposed exhibitor time.  GeneaBloggers took this opportunity to go to the designated area in the conference hall and have a meet and greet and get some blog posts published.  How fun to meet so many of our fellow...

Family Tree DNA announces DNA Day Sale

Family Tree DNA has announced its annual DNA Day sale.  This sale will focus on the FMS full mitochondrial sequence and Family Finder autosomal DNA tests.  With the implementation of The Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) for mitochondrial DNA, costs can be reduced without sacrificing quality.  Additionally, turnaround time can be reduced from 9-10 weeks to 5-6 weeks, or possibly even shorter if a sample is already in the lab. Sale prices are good until Monday, April 22nd at 11:59pm CDT. Full MtDNA       Sequence…. $189 Upgrades to FMS….$129 Y-DNA37 (new and add-on)…. $119 Y-DNA67 (new and add-on)…. $199 Y-DNA37 + Full MtDNA Sequence…. $308 Y-DNA12 + FF…. $218 Y-DNA37 + FF…. $288 Y-DNA67 + FF…. $368 Family Finder…. $169 Family Finder + Full MtDNA Sequence…. $358 SuperDNA….$388 (Y-67 + FMS) Comprehensive DNA…. $557 (Y-67 + FMS + FF) If you’ve been considering a test, now is the time! www.familytreedna.com...

NERGC 2013 – Thursday

This morning I arrived at 7:00 A.M. to volunteer at the Registration area and found out that I won a prize in the Volunteer Raffle!  I won a copy of Historical Timeline: The New England States, which was provided by Mass Researchers of Upton, MA.  Thank you for the wonderful prize.  I’m always happy to win something but this will be especially useful for me.  I love timelines! After helping out for a while, I was to meet a friend for breakfast.  She had to run off to get materials for a last minute presenter change, but the rest of us who had been planning to meet with her had breakfast together anyway.  It turns out that one of her friends grew up in Digby, Nova Scotia, a place that is on my “must visit” list.  My second lucky happening of the day! Opening session, “Millhand Migrations to 19th Century Lawrence and Lowell, Massachusetts,” was presented by my ProGen 13 mentor, Sandra McLean Clunies.  Sandy is an amazing speaker.  She is organized, pulled together, relaxed, natural, and FUNNY!  I just love her.  I was so happy to be able to help her as much as I could with getting her things put together after the presentation.  The talk gave some background on the role of mills in the Industrial Revolution and then provided case studies of three individuals.  What amazing, and sometimes tragic, stories came out of the mill towns.  We learned of the Pemberton Mill collapse, which was one of the worst industrial accidents in American history.  The five-story building had been filled with heavy equipment, which caused the collapse.  Many were...

NERGC 2013 New England Regional Genealogical Conference – Tech Day

NERGC 2013 kicked off today at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center in Manchester, New Hampshire.  If my count at lunch was correct, about 150 people turned out for this new offering at NERGC.  It seems that it was a success! First to talk today was Stephen P. Morse, best known for his invention of the 8086 processor. Morse gave a talk called “Deep Linking and Deeper Linking: How to get the most out of existing Search Applications.”  The purpose of this talk, according to the handout, was “to expose you to the techniques that were used on the One-Step website and give you a better appreciation for what there is and how to use it.”  Morse talked about URL editing, using search forms, man in the middle, and complete takeover.  He shared how to block deep linking and defeating the deep-linking block.  Notes that contain the information from this presentation can be found online at www.stevemorse.org under publications. The next speaker was Laura Prescott, who presented “Publish Your Genealogy Online.”  As always, Prescott was an informative and engaging speaker.  She reviewed available genealogy software and gave an introduction to options for building a genealogy website.  Genealogy software can be used to make webpages to be uploaded to the internet.  Alternately, the webpages can be made online.  Ancestry.com offers a solution to put your information online to share if you choose.  TNG, The Next Generation of Genealogy sitebuilding builds pages for online sharing by using GEDCOMs that can be created using any genealogy software.  Some items to consider when building a website include cost, domain name, publishing options, layout, sharing and control options, and alternatives to viewing online....

8th Annual Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Day 2

ISOGG FTDNA Chapter Meeting Sunday morning at the conference always starts with a meeting of the International Society of Genetic Genealogists (ISOGG) FTDNA Chapter.  ISOGG President Katherine Borges reminded everyone that ISOGG is a free support network for genetic genealogists.  Upon joining ISOGG, members receive an invitation to the ISOGG mailing list.  Katherine reminded everyone that ISOGG is self-supporting and hosts booths.  They maintain speakers list.  If you speak on Genetic Genealogy, please submit your name. Alice Fairhurst is in charge of the ISOGG Y-SNP tree.  She pleaded with the audience for volunteers to help administrate the tree.  There are just a few people who struggle to keep up with everything on a voluntary basis outside of their regular jobs, which often includes engineering and IT positions.  Alice shared changes that we can expect, including migrating ISOGG to a more powerful server and utilizing an SQL database.  The tree will remain in its current style through 2012 and she is not sure if they will be able to get the new tree up in January.  It is still too early to say. It is going to be very important to learn SNP names, as subclade names may change as new discoveries are found on the Geno project.  The new system is going to be parent / child.  She said, “The explosion in knowledge in the last two years has been tremendous.”  Many universities and students are now using the ISOGG tree and routinely send notes of thanks to the group for all they’ve done and are doing.  The ISOGG page that receives the most hits is the Index to Y-DNA SNPs. Brian Swann, the ISOGG European Coordinator for England and Wales, has...

8th Annual Conference on Genetic Genealogy – Day 1

The 8th Annual Conference on Genetic Genealogy was held at the Sheraton Intercontinental North Houston on November 9-10, 2012.  Bennett Greenspan opened the conference with a welcome speech that included some new information for group administrators.  Usually Max does the opening, but his voice was not cooperative so Bennett had the honors this year. Bennett started by explaining the corporate structure of the company, Gene by Gene.  There are four branches: ancestry, health, research, and paternity.  The branch most people are familiar with is Family Tree DNA, the ancestry branch of Gene by Gene.  The health branch is called DNA Traits.  This branch does gene sequencing work for hospitals on a few continents and is a regulated branch.  DNA DTC  specializes in research and next generation sequencing including the entire exome at 80x coverage and the whole genome.  Finally, DNA Findings specializes in paternity testing and immigration. Family Tree DNA has purchased 1.5 million vials since its inception.  The vials have a tethered strap on the lid, which was ultimately causing wrist strain for the lab employees and wasting valuable time and resources.  Family Tree DNA discovered a company in Europe with an automatic capper and decapper that will also dispense the proteinase K to the approximately 500 sample tubes processed per day.  The new tubes will have a red removable cap.  More automation comes to Family Tree DNA! While waiting for Spencer Wells to join in live via Skype, Bennett answered a question about Geno 2.0.  Bennett indicated that National Geographic has decided that all people should buy Geno 2.0 through their catalog and get the nice kit that they have designed.  Bennett suspects (but cannot...

© 2009-2015 Jennifer Zinck All Rights Reserved